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Ventilation

Ventilation

Domestic Ventilation Systems

 

Yorkshire Dampcourse can design, commission, test and service domestic ventilation systems.

From the 1st October 2010 domestic ventilation became "notifiable work" as part of the Building Regulations Approved Document Part F.

With stringent regulations to meet, it is crucial that domestic ventilation systems are installed, inspected, and commissioned to the current standards to maintain compliance and system efficiency.

Domestic ventilation "experts" must be trained and registered to test and commission ventilation systems on new build homes. They are expected to be able to provide right-first-time installations so that commissioning is easy and occupants can be confident that their ventilation systems will perform efficiently.

Yorkshire Dampcourse air flow testing

It is also possible for ventilation systems in existing dwellings to be tested for conformity to the current regulations, using the same standards, or to retro fit ventilation systems to existing domestic dwellings.

Yorkshire Dampcourse has had this training and certification through Nuaire, one of the main suppliers of domestic and other ventilation systems into the UK market. This was carried out at Nuaire's BPEC (British Plumbers Employer's Council) approved training facility in South Wales, over a two-day course.

The course covers the various types of domestic ventilation systems that are encountered, and is delivered as part theory, part practical sessions, culminating in an open book multiple-choice assessment that must be passed with a 100% mark.

 

 

The training course is based on BPEC's "Domestic Ventilation Systems 2010" course book, setting out up-to-date standards, legislation, recommendations and best practise. Three modules were covered  to explore ventilation in context within the new regulations: -

  • Air flow requirements and calculations
  • Health and safety
  • Design, installation, inspection, testing, commissioning, and the provision of system documentation / information.

On completion of the course and qualification through the assessment, the qualification is registered with BPEC, and is recognised and accepted by NAPIT (National Association of Professional Inspectors and Testers) and most other scheme  providers

Please contact YDC if we can help you with your domestic ventilation systems.

 


 

There are four main categories of ventilation systems identified in the Building Regulations Approved Document Part F 2010, with a number of other additional systems that are also approved.

 

 

System 1 Intermittant extract fans and background ventilators

 

System 1 – Intermittent extract fans with background ventilators

Local extract fans are fitted in a dwelling’s “wet rooms” (bathrooms, utility rooms and kitchens) and provide rapid extraction of moisture and other pollutants. They operate under occupant manual or automatic control (e.g. PIR or humidity). Fans are mounted in windows, ceilings or walls, all ducted directly to outside. Replacement air is provided by background ventilators that must be correctly sized, such as trickle vents and other dwelling leakage (e.g. via windows and doors). Through ventilation must also be ensured with correct gaps below doors to allow good air flow.

System 2 Passive Stack Ventilation

System 2 - Passive Stack Ventilation

A passive stack ventilation system comprises inlet grilles located in wet rooms, connected via near vertical ducts to ridge or other roof terminals. Warm moist air is drawn up the ducts by a combination of the “stack effect” and wind. Replacement dry air is drawn from the core of the dwelling, via background ventilators, e.g. trickle vents. There must also be gaps below door to allow good air flow.

 

System 3 Continuous Mechanical Extract Ventilation

System 3 - Continuous Mechanical Extract Ventilation (MEV)

This is a continuously running, low speed, mechanical extract system, removing air from wet rooms, via a single central ventilation unit, which discharges waste air most typically above the roof line. Other configurations exist, including those with continuously running room extract fans. These are referred to as de-centralised MEV. Most systems are two speed – a low trickle ventilation rate (the rates are specified within Part F tables) and a high speed boost. Boost activation can be manual, or automatic via proximity sensors (PIR) or humidity controlled. Replacement dry air is drawn from the core of the dwelling, via background ventilators, e.g. trickle vents. There must also be gaps below doors to allow good air flow.

 

System 4 Continuous mechanical extract ventilation with heat recovery

System 4 - Continuous Mechanical Balanced Ventilation with Heat Recovery (MVHR)

This system combines both supply and extract ventilation in one system, the separate airflows passing close to each other within a heat exchanger, so that outgoing air transfers most of its heat to the incoming air.

Typically, warm moist air is extracted from wet rooms via ducting, passed through the heat exchanger, and vented outside. Intake air passes through the heat exchanger and is ducted into habitable rooms like lounges and bedrooms.

Most systems are two speed – a low trickle ventilation rate (the rates are specified based Part F tables) and a high speed boost. Boost activation can be manual, or automatic via proximity sensors (PIR) or humidity controlled. Systems are balanced so that volume of air introduced to the dwelling is equivalent to the volume of air extracted.

Approved system Positive Input Ventilation

Approved system - Positive Input Ventilation

 A fan mounted usually in a roof space runs continuously to push air into the dwelling via a central hall or landing vent, which creates a slight positive pressure of air within the dwelling. Excess water vapour is not directly extracted by these systems, but the positive pressure causes the dwelling to leak air via background ventilators or other gaps in the building structure. Fan run speed is usually low, but can be occupant controlled. The units are low cost to run and are particularly suited to properties with condensation problems. See our Condensation and Mould section.

 

Approved System Single room Heat Recovery Ventilation

 

Approved System - Single Room Heat Recovery Ventilation (SRHRV)

Single room heat recovery ventilators are a development of the extract fan. They provide a balanced flow of supply and extract air into wet rooms (e.g. bathrooms, kitchens, utility rooms). A simple cross-flow heat exchanger recovers heat from the outgoing air and pre-heats incoming air. Units are usually dual speed, providing low speed continuous trickle ventilations, and high speed boost flows.

Boost activation can be manual, or automatic via proximity sensors (PIR) or humidity controlled. Replacement dry air is drawn from outside the dwelling.

 

 The 6 house ventilation layout drawings above were extracted from the British Plumbers Employer's Council (BPEC) publication "Domestic Ventilations Systems 2010" and are copyright of BPEC Services Ltd. - September 2010.

 

 

 

Categories
Ventilation System details Certification All domestic ventilation systems that comply with Building Regulations Part F 2010 will also have been fully documented and recorded in terms of the system details and the system conformity.

Calculation of Air Flow Rates for Ventilation This form enables ventilation experts to calculate the intermittent or continuous air flows required under Building Regulations Part F 2010 for domestic ventilation systems.

Background ventilation This download gives you the required background ventilation openings that apply for air-sealed and air-leaky houses, based on the number of bedrooms in the dwelling.

 
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